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Elasto Proxy

  • Four Core Values That Define Elasto Proxy

    Core ValuesCore values describe what we believe and guide the way that we act. These deeply-held values also serve as a mirror of sorts. When a company’s behavior reflects its core values, employees see this consistency. Customers and vendors recognize integrity, too. Inside and out, a company needs to be true in both word and deed. That’s why at Elasto Proxy, we don’t just talk about our core values. We show you who we are in all that we do.

    Maybe you’ve done business with Elasto Proxy for years. Maybe you’re a new customer or vendor.  Regardless, we’d like you to know more about who we are and what our core values mean for you. Elasto Proxy is a growing, global company that’s powered by problem solvers. We’re also engaged, professional, and loyal. Regular readers of our blog have come to appreciate our application knowledge and technical expertise. But do you know how our core values support your success? Continue reading

  • Five Things to Know About Elasto Proxy’s Capabilities

    CapabilitiesHow much do you know about Elasto Proxy’s capabilities? Maybe you place an occasional order for coils. Maybe you receive releases of gaskets against a blanket purchase order instead. Elasto Proxy is both a rubber distributor and a gasket fabricator, but we’re also more – a lot more. If you haven’t talked to Elasto Proxy in a while, now is a great time to learn what else we can do for you. Why take a chance on an untested supplier when what you may need is available from a trusted partner? Continue reading

  • Nitrile Rubber for Sealing and Insulation

    Nitrile RubberWhen is nitrile rubber the right choice for sealing and insulation? This common elastomer is known by many names, including Buna-N, NBR, and acrylonitrile butadiene. There are plenty of trade names for nitrile, too. No matter what you call it, nitrile rubber offers good resistance to oils, fuels, and chemicals. Temperature and environmental conditions are limiting factors, however, and may require the selection of a more expensive material such as Viton™.

    In this article from Elasto Proxy, you’ll learn about nitrile’s advantages and disadvantages. You’ll also examine NBR compounds, compare commercial and specialty Buna-N, and consider some typical nitrile applications. Elasto Proxy supplies specialty nitrile products to a variety of industries and can create a custom sealing solution that meets your specific requirements. Nitrile isn’t the only oil-resistant elastomer, but it’s a cost-effective choice compared to some other compounds.

    Nitrile Advantages and Disadvantages

    Nitrile rubber provides good-to-excellent resistance to many oils and solvents. Examples include:

    • animal and vegetable oils
    • crude petroleum oil
    • kerosene and gasoline
    • liquified petroleum (LP) gases
    • motor oils
    • mineral oil based hydraulic fluids
    • silicone greases and oils

    For engineers and buyers, it’s important to understand that nitrile’s resistance to petroleum oils is limited by temperature. According to most chemical resistance charts, nitrile resists petroleum oil at temperatures up to 250° F (121° C). If your application requires both oil resistance and higher temperature resistance, a fluorocarbon such as Viton™ may be required instead. Nitrile is also unsuitable for highly polar solvents such as acetone, which is used in some food processing and medical applications.

    Nitrile’s advantages include good physical properties such as resistance to compression set, tearing, and abrasion. Typically, NBR or Buna-N comes in durometers (Shore A) ranging from 20 to 95 for applications that require a softer or harder rubber. Nitrile resists water, but provides poor resistance to weather, ozone, and aging. Acrylonitrile butadiene is also unsuitable for some applications because Buna-N won’t withstand temperatures that are colder than -40° F (-40° C).

    Nitrile Compounds and Specialty Grades

    Through compounding, material suppliers have developed different types of nitrile with enhanced material properties. For example, hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) can withstand slightly higher temperatures than NBR and provides improved resistance to polar fluids. Carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber (XNBR) has a higher compression set than Buna-N and offers improved tear and abrasion resistance. Nitrile can also be blended with polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC).

    For engineers and buyers, choosing the right type of nitrile may involve comparing commercial rubber to specialty grades. Commercial grades generally cost less and are available in higher minimum order quantities (MOQs). Specialty grades generally cost more and have larger MOQs, but they’re custom compounds with improved properties. ASTM D2000 provides a standard way to describe elastomers and uses the designations BF, BG, BK, and CH with both standard and specialty nitrile. Continue reading

  • Five Things You Need to Know About Rubber

    Five Things You Need to Know About RubberSome engineers and buyers already know which type of rubber they need for sealing and insulation. Others may ask if rubber comes in colors other than black (yes, it does), or specify an elastomer that costs too much or won’t meet their application requirements.

    Material scientists can spend their entire careers learning about rubber. Engineers and buyers don’t have time for such as singular focus. That’s why Elasto Proxy, a custom-fabricator of industrial rubber products, brings you this list of five things you need to know about rubber:

    • Durometer and compression drive seal performance
    • Chemical resistance can be critical – and complicated
    • Environmental resistance supports longer service life
    • Rubber parts have different tolerances than metal parts
    • The best seal and gasket designs aren’t an afterthought

    Let’s take a closer look at why these things matter to your sealing success. Continue reading

  • Commercial Grade Rubber vs. Specialty Rubber: Make the Right Choice

    Commercial Grade RubberCommercial grade rubber provides sealing and insulation for a wide variety of applications. Compounds such as commercial grade EPDM, silicone, and neoprene also cost less than specialty rubber materials that meet standards, approvals, or regulatory requirements from organizations such as ASTM International, Underwriters Laboratories (UL), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

    For engineers, choosing the right rubber means understanding when a specialty material is required, and when a commercial grade rubber is sufficient. Engineers want to make sure that the products they design meet application requirements, but over-specifying an elastomer can incur unnecessary costs. In addition to paying more per unit of material, you may have to buy greater minimum order quantities (MOQs).

    In this article from Elasto Proxy, we’ll consider the differences between commercial grade rubber and specialty rubber in terms of some real-world examples. You’ll also learn about some best practices that can strengthen your seal designs. Continue reading

  • Neoprene Rubber for Sealing and Insulation

    Neoprene RubberWhen is neoprene rubber the right choice for sealing and insulation? This synthetic elastomer isn’t new, and chemists have created many other materials since neoprene was invented in 1930. Yet neoprene offers an excellent balance of properties, especially for industrial rubber products that require resistance to hydrocarbons, heat, flexing, and vibration.

    In this article from Elasto Proxy, you’ll learn how neoprene offers advantages for a variety of applications. Engineers and buyers can specify various types of neoprene rubber, including grades that are approved or certified according to regulatory requirements or industry standards. You’ll also learn how neoprene rubber materials support custom fabrication for seals, gaskets, and insulation. Continue reading

  • The Top 7 Sealing and Insulation Posts of 2017

    Best-of-2017The Elasto Proxy Blog is starting the New Year with a quick look back at how we helped readers solve their sealing and insulation challenges in 2017. Whether you’re new to the Blog or a veteran reader of our 275 posts, we hope you’ll enjoy this review and will let us know what you’d like to read about in 2018.

    Here are the top sealing and insulation posts of 2017. Continue reading

  • Bulb Trim Seal Compounds, Colors, and Approvals

    Bulb Trim Seal Compounds, Colors, and ApprovalsBulb trim seal compounds, colors, and approvals may surprise you.

    Bulb trim seals don’t just come in EPDM rubber. They’re available in colors besides black, too. That’s good news if you need to use recyclable materials, or if you’re searching for colorful sealing solutions to complement distinctive product designs. Bulb trim seals that contain EPDM aren’t all the same either. Some meet specific industry or regulatory standards. Others are made of harder or softer rubber.

    Do you need bulb trim seals for doors, hatches, or enclosures? In this week’s blog entry, Elasto Proxy’s last for 2017, we’ll finish the year with a flourish – and with a look at some of the compounds, colors, and approvals for bulb trim seals. Black EPDM gaskets are available if you need them, but procurement and engineering personnel may have more choices in compounds than they may realize. Continue reading

  • Bulb Trim Seals: Three Measurements You Need to Know

    Bulb Trim Seal MeasurementsLearn about bulb trim seal measurements from Elasto Proxy. 

    Bulb trim seals are industrial rubber products that are used to seal and insulate doors, hatches, and enclosures. They fit radiused corners and have separate bulb and retainer sections, each of which can have a different durometer (hardness) and use a different material. The bulb compresses to form a seal when the door, hatch, or enclosure is closed. The trim or retainer attaches to the flange or substrate.

    There are many different types of bulb trim seals, and plenty to learn about these industrial rubber products. In this two-part series from Elasto Proxy, we’ll examine three bulb trim seal measurements that engineers need to specify: bulb size, bend radius, and flange thickness. Continue reading

  • Silicone Connectors for Diesel-Powered Vehicles and Equipment

    Silicone ConnectorsSilicone connectors are molded rubber parts that connect the intake pipes and tubes in diesel-powered vehicles and equipment. These engine components resist high temperatures while providing strength and flexibility. Typically, silicone connectors are used in mobile equipment such as generator sets (gensets), ships and boats, and on-road and off-road equipment for forestry, mining, construction, and agriculture. Continue reading

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